providence

Surprise Me Mr. Davis is a band and plays Union Hall on 04.16



Surprise Me Mr. Davis is a is an electric-folk band consisting of virginia based folksinger Nathan Moore, the members of NYC/Providence/Montreal avant-rock band The Slip and pianist Marco Benevento. They formed in 2003 in Boston while Moore was visiting The Slip at their apartment and the blizzard of 2003 hit. They were snowed in at the Barr brothers Mission Hill home for five days with a brand new stereo microphone and computer. This storm was the catalyst for a home recording session that cemented the collaboration. Since then, the four musicians have been keeping up with the tradition of meeting before blizzards, hurricanes or other natural disasters that force them in the company of each other and their instruments, as confirmed by the fact that some news channels are reporting that the Icelandic vulcanic ash cloud will hit Brooklyn exactly during the band's performance at Union Pool on 04.16.

   

Interview with Jeff Prystowsky from The Low Anthem

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The Low Anthem dug their heels deep into the New England folk rock music circuit with cleverly crafted musical arrangements and a well-articulated sound that vaulted them into an all-inclusive global kudos. This trio turned quartet stands at the forefront of an abundant arsenal of off-beat instruments, which they employ to resonate the musical byproducts of their inventively framed themes. On the brink of their inaugural U.S. headlining tour, Jeff conversed with us about hitting the road, new additions, the weight of kinship and a followup record. The Low Anthem will be touring New England through 17-24.

Deli: Can you talk to me about the European Tour you guys just got back from?

Jeff: Sure. European touring is really great for an American band, at least speaking from my own experience. We’ve had just a great time in Europe. We have been over there four times now and each time has been really special and we’ve had great shows. On this last tour, we played a lot of great theaters, like Shepherd’s Bush Empire in London, which is one of the most beautiful theaters I’ve played in. As well as the great music hall in Belgium called AB and a great one in Amsterdam called the Paradiso, an old converted church that's now a music venue. It makes it so much easier to put on a great show when you are playing in a venue that has a certain character to it, you know? It really helps for the show and for the performance. We’ve had great tours in Europe and we will be going back again in August to play the festival season there.

Read the whole interview by Alexandra Johnson HERE

   

Musicians needed for fundraiser!

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It's A Gift (29A Union Square across from the Citizen's Bank)  is in threat of being shut down due to finances. The store sells artwork and crafts by adults with physical and mental disabilities. During the Somerville Open Studios May 1st and 2nd, It's A Gift will have silk-screening in the store. Community members may bring in clothing or buy vintage clothing or a t-shirt ($5 or less) to have an image by one of our artists printed on them for $10.

In the evenings is where they need musicians to volunteer their time and talent to saving the store. It's a Gift will be having a Save Our Store fundraiser concert as a Somerville Open Studios after party. Starting at 6:30pm on May 1st and 2nd musicians can play a 30-45 min. set each. As an extra incentive for musicians, they can make a silkscreen of a band image/logo so that the musicians can make t-shirts,etc. If the image is brought in at the Somerville Open Studios they can have it ready with in a couple weeks.

For more info email the editor at: needitor@thedelimagazine.com

--The Deli Staff

   

SXSW day 5 - some of the best Austin Bands

The final day of SXSW 2010 moved in slow motion. Indescribably exhausted, I meandered through a more suburban part of town to Domy Books for the “What by Whatever Day Party.” In the backyard, the sunshine beamed down on a wooden stage that bounced with ever band, beginning with The Eastern Sea (bottom picture), a folksy seven-piece from Austin. Following them were fellow Austinites, The Frontier Brothers, whose vibrant energy radiated and awakened me from my zombie state. Last but not least, The Bright Light Social Hour (top picture) substantiated their recent award from the Austin Chronicle for the “Best Indie Band” (They should also win “Funniest Band.”), closing my SXSW on a high note. Final thought about SXSW 2010: fantastic event, great experience, I only wish venues in Austin were bigger: I had a great schedule planned out but I was unable to get into a lot of shows even with a wristband because they were too crowded... I guess everyone had the same bands in mind! - Meijin Bruttomesso

   

SXSW day 4: She and Him, SVIIB, Andrew W.K., Steve Conte + more

The penultimate day of SXSW took a turn for the frigid, making the festival challenging to endure. Bright and early, I froze in a two-block long line for “Mr. and Mrs. T and Rachael Ray’s Feedback Festival” at Stubb’s BBQ where Steve Conte and the Crazy Truth (NYC, bottom picture), School of Seven Bells (NYC), Andrew W.K (NYC), Street Sweeper Social Club (LA), Jakob Dylan and Three Legs, She and Him (Portland, top picture), and many more hit backyard and indoor stages. Miniature pulled-pork “sammies” and chicken quesadillas were almost unattainable, but a lucky taste test of the hearty h'ordeuvres satiated me for a short shopping spree at the American Apparel Flea Market and evening events. I caught a glimpse of The Cringe at The Texas Rockfest outdoor stage, and later, a full list of trios including New Madrid (NYC), at Mugshots Bar. The day’s highlight was an unforeseen recording session on the Lifestream AOL bus with Black Taxi, who astonished all aboard with their infectious songs and instrumental resourcefulness. - Meijin Bruttomesso