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Tune in and drop out with David V Britton's new video "Silk Null"

The electronic compositions of New York artist David V. Britton have a two-pronged effect, inclining listeners towards focus and meditative relaxation at the same time. Such is the case for new video “Silk Null,”directed by Jeff Mertz, which consists of Britton’s calming-yet-intense sound work against processed 360 degree footage of Mertz’s neighborhood, creating what he dubs a “virtual reality landscape.” Deep hues and a glitch-like quality well fit the at-times overwhelming nature of the track, creating an audio-visual experience that washes over the viewer in waves of varying intensity, never too lush but always hyper-stimulating. These qualities make “Silk Mull” recommended viewing for fans of abstract expressionism or long-form ambient music — think Brian Eno meets Mark Rothko. Watch it below, preferably with a VR headset if you’ve got one on hand, and be sure to check out Britton's recent LP Qualia as well.

   

PREMIERE: Career Boy ponder an uncertain future on “What’s Next?”

One could view Brooklyn-based outfit Career Boy as the natural successors to last decade’s garage rockers — their white knuckle guitar work, marked by a slightly discordant sound, combined with frothy, fast and loose vox evoke the sound of predecessors like Jay Reatard and Harlem. In a different sense, however, new track and video “What’s Next” finds the band lyrically situated in an uneasy rut, pondering personal flaws of excessive drinking and “waiting for what’s next to come,” bounding outwards without a sense of personal direction. Moreover, such songwriting encapsulates the sentiments of our current age, capturing the energy many of us feel to do something, literally anything new, while feeling woefully uncertain as to what the first step is. Regardless of when whatever's next arrives, Career Boy will be ready to start — stream the premiere below.

   

Drug Couple bunker down (indoors) on new tracks "No Outside / Alone 2gether"

Droves of New York musicians have sought to create art that makes sense of what’s happening in the city right now, but Brooklyn-based duo Drug Couple have been creating prescient-yet-comforting music since late 2016. Their previous EP Little Hits and the forthcoming Choose Your Own Apocalypse detail the necessity of human intimacy during strange times, with new double B-side No Outside / Alone 2gether continuing in a similar vein. Notably more driven by a percussive groove (“No Outside”) and more prone to darker tones (“Alone 2gether”) than previous efforts, the two songs represent a expansion of Drug Couple’s sound beyond the softer, more downtempo qualities of Little Hits. That said, both tracks hone in on recurring themes of companionship and cautious optimism (or sunny pessimism), embodying the zeitgeist of our increasingly uncertain epoch. Regardless of how you’re quarantining, give it a stream below, and keep an eye out for Drug Couple’s next extended play, out this August.

   

Henry Grant maintains composure on new track “Stay Well (feat. Ryan Wyner)”

You’re likely already acquainted with the psych-laden, occasionally crunchy sound of Henry Grant by way of his previous project Zula, and new single “Stay Well (feat. Ryan Wyner)” shifts Grant’s hazy instrumental approach from driving indie rock towards hazy dream pop. Still present is an off-kilter, DIY approach to instrumentation that gives “Stay Well” a discordant-yet-melodic energy, albeit such sounds are now presented at a chilled pace. Moreover, this steady, dreamlike quality lends itself well to Grant’s lyrics, which detail the quarantine distance, the process of “celebrating lonely sounds” and “laying low till they figure it out.” While certain elements of Grant’s songwriting feel anxious and claustrophobic at times (“formless feelings, melancholy”) the track’s mellow, progressive structure endows a sense of resolve, an ability to maintain cool composure in the center of the storm. Stream it below, and watch Henry Grant’s page for more intrepid synth later this year.

   

Aubrey Haddard embraces (and avoids) the spotlight on “Thin Line”

Brooklyn-based performer Aubrey Haddard understands the scrutiny one faces as a performer — the inkling that “everyone’s watching,” of feel[ing] on the display.” Such sentiments influenced her latest single “Thin Line,” a new pop offering with strong indie rock roots. Driven by a walking alt soul baseline and a punchy percussive backbone, Haddard’s melodious range dominates the space, bringing the necessary bravado this maximalist effort, while lyrically detailing feelings of uncertainty, or in her own words, “starting to realize I’m walking on a thin line” just as everything seems to be going fine. It’s a clever(and catchy) exploration of the singer’s psyche, a track that splits the difference between extreme confidence and self-doubt that feels quintessentially human — watch the video below, and keep an eye out for Haddard’s forthcoming LP, out later this year.