Indie Rock

The Deli Philly's April Record of the Month: Ugly Laugh - The Original Crooks and Nannies

The Original Crooks and Nannies follow-up to 2015’s Soup For My Girlfriend begins with the sputtering staccato of “Call It Good.” The track’s rhythmic pulse collides flawlessly with Madeline Rafter’s vocals and buzzing synth, supported by a backbeat tailor-made for the dance floor. The album’s opener prepares its listener with ease for the pulsating energy of “Carry Me,” a heartfelt melody that brings to mind the romantics of Matt and Kim or the twee-drenched lyricism of Mates of State. The track’s sentiments are earnest, amplified simultaneously by urgent diction and humming chords. “Carry Me” is a living testament to The Original Crooks and Nannies’ ability to craft love songs so cathartic that it hurts.
 
Similarly, the unabashed desperation of “Throw Out” followed by the electro-hum of “Television” suitably precedes the tangibly raw frustration of “Dates.” For Rafter and her bandmate, Sam Huntington, drinking poison and having smashed teeth proves to be a more desirable fate than going on a date. Even in its state of exaggeration, the track is a potential artifact of our contemporary moment, depicting romance in the age of Tinder and the banality of #netflixandchill. It’s a critique with a memorable hook.
 
“Ghost” is suitably haunting with lines like “I can make you feel/I can make you feel much better” and crashing riffs and cymbals. The narrative of the song, like its namesake, will linger in your mind long after its heartfelt and nearly ethereal end. The intimacy of “Ghost” is transformed into a cinematic nostalgia in “Shake Hands.” Breathing to life an account of suburban antics and shared memories, Rafter and Huntington’s duet-esque ballad is irresistibly sweet, even for the most jaded listener, preparing its audience for the forthright emotives equally fervent in “Crying at the Dog Park.”
 
The woozy start of “Central Heating” and the narrative blends effortlessly into Ugly Laugh’s final track “Holy Wreck.” The album’s closer is an intimate confession paying homage to failures, flaws, and limitations. It’s a veneration of vulnerability and the beauty that can be found between fractures. “Holy Wreck,” much like the songs that precede it, is introspective, a melodic mirror reflecting the complexities of emotion and the adjacent irony of love, making Ugly Laugh the quintessential album that you didn’t know you were waiting for. It begs to be replayed again and again. - Dianca London

   

New Music Video: "Talking Quietly Of Anything With You" - Free Cake For Every Creature

It's an early Friday morning, and the hushed vocals of Katie Bennett, a.k.a. Free Cake For Every Creature, is here to ease you into your day because we know that no loud noises and human interaction before your first cup of coffee is essential. Below is Bennett's new video for the title track from her forthcoming album Talking Quietly Of Anything With You, due out April 15 via Double Double Whammy. The dreamy black & white footage was directed by Craig Scheihing.

   

Vundabar takes on Great Scott on 4.30

Vundabar serves as a breath of fresh air out of the tidal waves of folk and hardcore rock that swamp Boston’s music scene. With indie rock at the core of its DNA, Vundabar infuses pop melodies and jangly guitar riffs to create their infectiously energetic sound. Often times switching up the tempo and rhythm mid-way through a song, these sudden changes of direction give their songs a welcomed air of unpredictability and a sharp edge to dance along on. What Vundabar manages to do wonderfully is probably how they take quiet moments in their songs and blow it up with bursts of jagged electric guitars and ragged vocals seamlessly, shocking you with currents of effervescence. The only thing that rivals their sound is their live performances, so catch them at Great Scott on April 30 and take listen below. - Adriana S Ballester

 

   

Psych Artists featured in The Deli's SXSW issue: Jackson Boone

Portland's Jackson Boone is the latest in a long line of Syd Barrett acolytes going back to David Bowie and Marc Bolan. Boone, in fact, works past much of Barrett's tension en route to spaced-out oddities as dramatic and modern as they are retro. Check out single Runaway from his latest LP Natural Changes. (This blurb was featured on the latest SXSW issue of The Deli Magazine, dedicated to psychedelia)

   

New Jo Kusy LP Available for Streaming

Hot on the heels of The Deli Philly’s February Record of the Month, You Break Me, Jo Kusy (Far-Out Fangtooth, The Whips) has quickly issued a follow-up. Wild Violets, which will be officially released on April 3, is currently available for streaming, and is chock-full of pillowy lo-fi pop, allowing one’s imagination to subconsciously float. Kusy will perform on the Sunday afternoon of its release date at Beautiful World Syndicate, as part of a double tape release with Birds courtesy of Time Castle Recordings.