Tango Alpha Tango

Photos from The Deli Portland's MFNW Day Show

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Photos from The Deli Portland's MFNW Day Show 


 


 


 


 


 

 


 

 


 

 

All photos courtesy of Craig Willilams     


 

   Jacob Miller and the Bridge City Crooners      


   

The Quick and Easy Boys      


   

Otis Heat      


   

Tango Alpha Tango      


 

 
 
 
   

Tango Alpha Tango

CD Name: 
Black Cloud
title_color: 
red
Music Link: 
https://soundcloud.com/tangoalphatango
Album Cover URL: 
http://pdxpick.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/TAT-Black-Cloud1.jpg
body: 
<p><a href="https://www.facebook.com/tangoalphatango" target="_blank">Tango Alpha Tango</a> are known for putting on a ferocious live show. Crumpling distortion, blasting drums and extended guitar solos create an energy that&rsquo;s impossible to capture on a recording. That being said, <em>Black Cloud</em> is about as close as you can get. Recorded live onto analog tape, the album moves with the dynamics of the band as they traverse through thirteen heavy, driven and emotionally charged tracks that showcase their range and versatility. &ldquo;Boom Boom&rdquo; starts the album off a synchronized rhythmic build into a bluesy guitar riff that could make the hair on the back of your neck stand on end; as it breaks into the raspy vocal intro of the explosive second track, &ldquo;Kill and Haight,&rdquo; you&rsquo;ll feel static surround your rocking head. A haunting cover of &ldquo;In My Time of Dying&rdquo; settles into a groove that tells an aged story long after the vocals have faded. An acoustic guitar and textured vocal harmonies provide a calm from the storm with tracks like the progressive &ldquo;Blood Orange&rdquo; and moving &ldquo;Simplest Song&rdquo;. &ldquo;All Mine Blues&rdquo; draws the album to a close with a racing snare, howling harmonica and comical shouts of possession. <em>Black Cloud</em> captures the unfiltered energy that defines Tango Alpha Tango, and is a must-listen for anyone who feels the catharsis contained within a rock show. <em>- Benjamin Toledo</em></p>
   

Interview with Tango Alpha Tango

Colin talked with Nathan from Tango Alpha Tango about thier new album, songwriting process and why they are drawn to the music they make. Check out the full interview here and be sure to get to Doug Fir this Saturday night to celebrate the release with Tango Alpha Tango, Minden and Violet Isle

   

Interview with Tango Alpha Tango

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Interview with Tango Alpha Tango
 

- by Colin Hudson

Your music is raw, awesome and heavy, but is there anything specific that made you choose the name Black Cloud?

The title, "Black Cloud", is also a song-title on the album that we feel sums up not only the sound of the band but a theme present on the record- dark and light. Musically, there's minor elements of the blues in the chords and structure mixed with major parts that tug back and forth. Lyrically the record, and song, can be viewed in the same way, a human struggle between good and evil, happiness and sadness, right and wrong.  
 
Aside from the name, is there an overall message or concept that you were trying to get across to the listener? What about a specific sound?
 
As I mentioned before, the record has a basic concept that, simply put, is really about the dark and light- for example, one wanting to do right but doing wrong, or doing wrong and not caring if it's right- basically what we all go through every day. I could go way more into detail but I'd rather not. I'd like the listener put themselves in the position of the protagonist and relate to it with their own interpretation.  
 
There is a good mix of softer, acoustic melodies as well as thrashing, distorted riffs. Is there a specific approach you took to make sure both of these were captured on the album?
 
I think the nature of how we recorded most of the album live, and to analog tape left room for the dynamics on the album- when we played softly, it sounded soft, and when we played harder that was captured as well, as we intended.  
 
Did the prior album, Tango Alpha Tango, dictate the direction and sound that you wanted to proceed with?
 
Yes, we had come across a sound that we wanted to progress with- rock & roll, but not just one side of it. Old music that we listen to often has soft songs, rock songs, even pop songs all cohesively weaved together and that's the kind of record we always have aimed to make. I think the last recording did that, we just wanted an even more honest approach with more live-playing all together and less polish. 
 
Can you give some specifics to when the process started of conceptualizing, writing and recording the album?
 
Most of the songs came about from one of two ways, songs I wrote and brought to the band as nearly finished songs, and the other half from equal input from playing together live. We play alot shows and jams during sets can turn into songs, or an idea at soundcheck. "Boom Boom" started with a drum beat at soundcheck, a bass-line, and then riff, keys, then improvised lyrics. We played it at the very show we wrote it at and there's a video of it online. But others, like "Blood Orange", or "Stop This Mess", were completely composed by myself. "I Want You", as you hear it on the album, was us jamming in the studio- mixed to tape on the spot thanks to David, our engineer, for his quick thinking and keen ears.
 
How have you managed to capture what you can do live onto a studio album?
 
Again, recording live onto tape was paramount in capturing the performances on the album.  We also didn't use a click on anything on the album that didn't have sequenced electronic drums, or things like that, so the tempos are natural and fluctuate slightly as they do live. This gives the listener a different experience, like they're in the room, or they're at a live show. Lastly, our preproduction for the album was playing live, I figured we'd flesh out the songs in a live setting, and after enough of that pressured environment in front of an audience we could make a record with ease in the studio.
 
The live album recorded at the Banana Stand is nothing short of epic, is there anything special you guys put into preparation for that? What were you able to take away besides a kick ass live album?
 
The Banana Stand was a great experience, and we didn't do anything differently for that than any show than any other. We had been playing a lot of live shows before it but I really like the idea of a live recording being a time-stamp, or benchmark to look back at, rather than the approach some bands take, where they mix new tracks into it, or fix bad notes, trying to give the best impression. The best impression to give people on a live album is to make them feel like they were in that basement, condensation dripping off the ceiling and walls, and the damp air smelling of beer and rock & roll. What we took away from it was a snapshot of one of the hundreds of shows we played together and all the places we traveled musically that one night, which brings the wonder and mystery of what all the other shows must've been like that we've long since forgotten. Not to mention being just one of a hundred or-so bands that have been a part of the Banana Stand scene all with the same story. What a great treasure the Banana Stand is to the Portland music scene.
 
The city of Portland is not known for its stretched out guitars solo or its blues scene, how do you manage to own this sound in a city that’s not calling for it?
 
I'm not really sure. I never set out to write blues or rock music in defiance of any scene or place that I was. When you're younger, listening to what you listen to, it's not to impress anybody, you do it because you like it. It's not that you're drawn to the music but almost like it's drawn to you. The same could be said for playing the guitar, growing up on a farm and learning about music from my family and playing in church I never thought about what scene I might be closest to because of where I was born, I just played a lot and happen to live near, and now in, Portland. So, I guess we just never asked what people wanted to hear, but played what we would want to hear in a band with what we could do.
 
What do you want your audience to know about your upcoming CD release show at the Doug Fir?
 
I think it's going to be a special show because we've put a lot of time and thought into the record, and of course the show. We're going to have some guest members on stage, it's going to filmed, and we're having some cool things like special lights- basically it's a bigger production than Tango Alpha Tango has had yet, and it will be a great experience. Also, two of Portland's finest bands are joining us on the bill, Violet Isle and Minden. You don't want to miss any part of this show.

 

 


 

 

 
 
 

 

   

Tango Alpha Tango Play White Eagle Saloon 4.13

Sometimes a band can carry a sound so heavy it punches you right in the guts. Tango Alpha Tango do just that. Party because they write and play from the guts and partly because they’re not afraid to play new age Satanic blues that stay-at-home mothers of the 1970s would panic about. To adventurous souls, however the distorted slide guitar that draws the likes of Jimmy Page and Jack White sound nothing short of beautiful. But enough of the preaching, Tango Alpha Tango simply knows how to get down and do so with excellent stage presence led by frontman and guitarist Nathan Trueb. The band’s powerful bass lines are traced by an affected and harmonious keyboard that are both held down by a thorough drummer. Nathan’s bluesy guitar and punkish vocals make this band one of the most powerful acts that Portland has to offer. - Colin Hudson