The Original Crooks and Nannies

Debut Very Bad Vibes LP Available for Streaming & Download

A few months back, The Original Crooks and Nannies announced that they were disbanding. Now, Sam Huntington has released the debut album from his new, technically solo venture Very Bad Vibes, though former bandmate Madeline Rafter did contribute vocals on two of the tracks ("Flu Season" and "Please"). Toothpaste has a sly, electro-R&B aesthetic, balancing magnetic songwriting with a knack to establish well-rounded, percussion-forward instrumentation. Personally navigating through an introspective lyrical approach, the collection of songs springs forth, while capable of hitting the core with a bare sense of exposure.

   

In the Cut: The Original Crooks and Nannies

As Sam Huntington and Madeline Rafter's high school friends started to set their focus on colleges, the two bonded over their desire to continue making music and bypass the academia route. The duo began recording under the moniker The Original Crooks and Nannies, a play off Thomas English Muffins' commercial tag line. While the recording of their debut album Soup For My Girlfriend might have been a learning lesson of "how to write songs together," Huntington and Rafter have taken a giant leap forward with their sophomore LP Ugly Laugh, The Deli Philly's April Record of the Month. They'll be performing this Saturday afternoon outside of The Fire as part of the Sundrop Music Fest, but first, get to know The Original Crooks and Nannies and their Ugly Laugh HERE!

   

New Video: "Shake Hands" (Live) - The Original Crooks and Nannies

The Original Crooks and Nannies stopped by the Brig in Philly to perform "Shake Hands," one of the multiple standouts off their sophomore album Ugly Laugh, which is The Deli Philly's April Record of the Month. Madeline Rafter calmly lays down strolling guitar lines, juxtaposed by her booming voice, while Sam Huntington charmingly bops around, manning the electronics, creating lo-fi, infectious beats, adorably playing off Rafter's lead. The duo finds just the right harmonious balance that can be felt throughout the group's latest LP.

The Original Crooks and Nannies - "Shake Hands" live at the Brig from Brig Sessions 

   

The Deli Philly's April Record of the Month: Ugly Laugh - The Original Crooks and Nannies

The Original Crooks and Nannies follow-up to 2015’s Soup For My Girlfriend begins with the sputtering staccato of “Call It Good.” The track’s rhythmic pulse collides flawlessly with Madeline Rafter’s vocals and buzzing synth, supported by a backbeat tailor-made for the dance floor. The album’s opener prepares its listener with ease for the pulsating energy of “Carry Me,” a heartfelt melody that brings to mind the romantics of Matt and Kim or the twee-drenched lyricism of Mates of State. The track’s sentiments are earnest, amplified simultaneously by urgent diction and humming chords. “Carry Me” is a living testament to The Original Crooks and Nannies’ ability to craft love songs so cathartic that it hurts.
 
Similarly, the unabashed desperation of “Throw Out” followed by the electro-hum of “Television” suitably precedes the tangibly raw frustration of “Dates.” For Rafter and her bandmate, Sam Huntington, drinking poison and having smashed teeth proves to be a more desirable fate than going on a date. Even in its state of exaggeration, the track is a potential artifact of our contemporary moment, depicting romance in the age of Tinder and the banality of #netflixandchill. It’s a critique with a memorable hook.
 
“Ghost” is suitably haunting with lines like “I can make you feel/I can make you feel much better” and crashing riffs and cymbals. The narrative of the song, like its namesake, will linger in your mind long after its heartfelt and nearly ethereal end. The intimacy of “Ghost” is transformed into a cinematic nostalgia in “Shake Hands.” Breathing to life an account of suburban antics and shared memories, Rafter and Huntington’s duet-esque ballad is irresistibly sweet, even for the most jaded listener, preparing its audience for the forthright emotives equally fervent in “Crying at the Dog Park.”
 
The woozy start of “Central Heating” and the narrative blends effortlessly into Ugly Laugh’s final track “Holy Wreck.” The album’s closer is an intimate confession paying homage to failures, flaws, and limitations. It’s a veneration of vulnerability and the beauty that can be found between fractures. “Holy Wreck,” much like the songs that precede it, is introspective, a melodic mirror reflecting the complexities of emotion and the adjacent irony of love, making Ugly Laugh the quintessential album that you didn’t know you were waiting for. It begs to be replayed again and again. - Dianca London

   

The Original Crooks and Nannies

CD Name: 
Ugly Laugh
title_color: 
darkorange
Music Link: 
https://crooksandnannies.bandcamp.com/
Album Cover URL: 
https://f1.bcbits.com/img/a1652821616_10.jpg
body: 
<div><span><a href="https://crooksandnannies.bandcamp.com/">The Original Crooks and Nannies</a>&rsquo;</span> follow-up to 2015&rsquo;s <i>Soup For My Girlfriend </i>begins with the sputtering staccato of &ldquo;Call It Good.&rdquo; The track&rsquo;s rhythmic pulse collides flawlessly with <span>Madeline Rafter&rsquo;s</span> vocals and buzzing synth, supported by a backbeat tailor-made for the dance floor. The album&rsquo;s opener prepares its listener with ease for the pulsating energy of &ldquo;Carry Me,&rdquo; a heartfelt melody that brings to mind the romantics of Matt and Kim or the twee-drenched lyricism of Mates of State. The track&rsquo;s sentiments are earnest, amplified simultaneously by urgent diction and humming chords. &ldquo;Carry Me&rdquo; is a living testament to <span>The Original Crooks and Nannies&rsquo; ability to craft love songs so cathartic that it hurts. </span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span>Similarly, the unabashed desperation of &ldquo;Throw Out&rdquo; followed by the electro-hum of &ldquo;Television&rdquo; suitably precedes the tangibly raw frustration of &ldquo;Dates.&rdquo; For Rafter and her bandmate, Sam Huntington, drinking poison and having smashed teeth proves to be a more desirable fate than going on a date. Even in its state of exaggeration, the track is a potential artifact of our contemporary moment, depicting romance in the age of Tinder and the banality of #netflixandchill. It&rsquo;s a critique with a memorable hook. </span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span>&ldquo;Ghost&rdquo; is suitably haunting with lines like &ldquo;I can make you feel/I can make you feel much better&rdquo; and crashing riffs and cymbals. The narrative of the song, like its namesake, will linger in your mind long after its heartfelt and nearly ethereal end. The intimacy of &ldquo;Ghost&rdquo; is transformed into a cinematic nostalgia in &ldquo;Shake Hands.&rdquo; Breathing to life an account of suburban antics and shared memories, Rafter and Huntington&rsquo;s duet-esque ballad is irresistibly sweet, even for the most jaded listener, preparing its audience for the forthright emotives equally fervent in&nbsp;&ldquo;Crying at the Dog Park.&rdquo; </span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span>The woozy start of &ldquo;Central Heating&rdquo; and the narrative blends effortlessly into <i>Ugly Laugh</i>&rsquo;s final track &ldquo;Holy Wreck.&rdquo; The album&rsquo;s closer is an intimate confession paying homage to failures, flaws, and limitations. It&rsquo;s a veneration of vulnerability and the beauty that can be found between fractures. &ldquo;Holy Wreck,&rdquo; much like the songs that precede it, is introspective, a melodic mirror reflecting the complexities of emotion and the adjacent irony of love, making <i>Ugly Laugh</i> the quintessential album that you didn&rsquo;t know you were waiting for. It begs to be replayed again and again. - <i>Dianca London</i></span></div>