Michelle Bacon

Show recap: The Clementines' EP release show at VooDoo, 5.9.14

(Photos by Jodie Platz)
 
Last Friday, The Clementines celebrated the release of their EP Someday/Over (see our review), a follow-up to their self-titled debut album released last summer. This time, they threw a big party to commemorate the occasion at VooDoo Lounge, with special guests The B’Dinas and Katy Guillen & the Girls.
 
 
The B’Dinas kicked off the party with an exuberant set, bringing with them enough quirkiness to create a light, jubilant mood as the audience filtered in. Each member showed off his/her own individual talents throughout the set, often switching off instruments and lead vocal duties from song to song.
 
This is a band that rides on the strength of its musical prowess, maintaining an intricate prog rock/blues sound without sounding busy or overwhelming. At times, The B’Dinas boasted impressive four-part vocal harmonies. Toward the end of the set, when Peter Lawless switched over from bass to saxophone and took over lead vocal duties on “That’s Not What She Said,” the group unleashed a musical fury that filled the large room.
 
 
 
 
With gilded anticipation, The Clementines took to the stage with a confidence and performance that lived up to the quality of their new album. With a bevy of new material, the group played for about an hour to a receptive crowd.
 
Guest violinist Kristin Chow sat in on a few songs, adding another powerful dynamic to a band that is most noted for the strength and soul of Nicole Springer’s voice. But since adding drummer Aaron Derington to the mix last fall, The Clementines have brought new elements to their overall sound. Tim Jenkins mostly played electric guitar for Friday’s show and switched to mandolin for a few songs, contributing flourishes to Springer’s voice as well as a necessary bite to the music. Travis Earnshaw’s bass lines provided a foundation and a bounce to each song.
 
For one of their final tunes, “Your History,” the band’s former drummer [and Katy Guillen & the Girls’ current drummer] Stephanie Williams guest starred while Derington moved over to keys—reminding us that this band is a far cry from its beginnings as an acoustic duo of Springer and Jenkins, and is further testament to its growth as musicians and performers. “I felt [our performance] was very inspired by all of the support there and truly was a celebration of completing an EP that we’re super proud of,” mentioned Springer.
 
 
 
Though The Clementines were the evening’s celebrated act, Katy Guillen & the Girls headlined the show and kept the audience on the dance floor. They’ve added new material to their set as they prepare to release their debut full-length album in the fall. As always, Guillen’s guitar playing was simultaneously brutal and captivating, matched by Williams’ fierce and flashy but deliberate, on-point drumming (and a new kit to boot) and Claire Adams’ booming bass scales.
 
Since taking fourth place at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis in January, the trio has honed its performance into that of a band fit to play about any midsize/large venue in the country—a giant feat for a group still young in its career. This showed on Friday evening, as VooDoo provided the high-end production necessary to augment their roaring sound and a professional, flawless performance. KG & the Girls will be traveling in the coming months, playing the Montreal International Jazz Festival in June, Daytona Blues Fest in October, and taking a 10-day tour of Sweden in November.
 
 
 
 
The Clementines and The B’Dinas will be playing together again at The Brick on Friday, May 23. You can catch Katy & the Girls next at BB’s Lawnside BBQ on Saturday, May 31.
 
 
 
--Michelle Bacon
 
Michelle is the editor of The Deli KC and does rhythmic stuff in The Philistines, Drew Black & Dirty Electric, Dolls on Fire, and Lucky Graves. She also writes for Ink. The rest of the time, she is a hobo.

Jodie Platz is a concert photographer, and also doubles as the tour manager for Not A Planet.
  
 

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Recap: MidCoast Takeover 2014

It’s an ever-expanding, atypical tradition, five years in the making.

It might seem difficult to grasp the concept of traveling over 700 miles to see several bands you could normally see at a venue a couple miles away from home. But there’s much more to it than that.
 
Each year, thousands of people from around the globe descend upon Austin, Texas, for an annual music fest that—with each growing year—features bigger names and flashier advertisements. Fortunately, unofficial, free showcases are literally wall-to-wall along 6th Street. For the mere price of navigating through a sea of people and eating at a few taco trucks along the way [oh, and transportation and boarding], you can see hundreds of bands of varying genres and qualities. You might randomly stumble into a dive bar to hear a band you’ve been digging for a couple years, you might discover a band barely anyone else knows about. That’s all an important part of the experience. But for a couple hundred folks from the Kansas City/Lawrence area, the Austin experience holds a deeper meaning.
 
In its fifth year, last week’s MidCoast Takeover was bigger than ever, with over 100 bands on a giant outdoor stage and an indoor acoustic stage at Shangri-La on East 6th Street, an area just on the other side of the I-35 divide that has increased in foot traffic and event volume over the past couple of years. The bar itself is typically a popular haunt for Austin natives, with a huge outdoor patio that reached its 230-person capacity during the four-day showcase.
 
MidCoast Takeover is organized by Midwest Music Foundation, an organization that helps musicians with emergency health care, but also aims to be a voice for the music community. One way of doing this is with MidCoast, which places local/regional musicians on a national stage in front of hundreds, be it a random passerby, the drummer in your band, or Exene Cervenka (yeah, she stopped by).
 
A few of the MidCoast bands from the KC area were official showcase acts (including Radkey, Beautiful Bodies, Josh Berwanger Band, Pedaljets), stacked up with other notable-as-of-late locals (Shy Boys, Me Like Bees, Not A Planet, Katy Guillen & the Girls) and national bands (Not In The Face, Two Cow Garage, Sphynx), on one of the largest stages with one of the most impressive productions in all of downtown Austin. At any given time between Wednesday and Saturday, quality music emanated from Shangri-La, ranging from The Noise FM’s indie-rock dance party to Heartfelt Anarchy’s smooth hip-hop/jazz mashup to Jorge Arana Trio’s calculated noise-rock grooves. Let’s also not forget the acoustic stage, which featured poetic songs from Vi Tran; bluesy, emotionally weighted tunes from Gregg Todt (Federation of Horsepower); quirky dance numbers from Nan Turner (Schwervon!); driving but delicate harmonies from Clairaudients, among dozens of other artists who injected a special type of heart and personality into their deconstructed songs.
 
 
 

 

Still, this begs the question: Why would you go all that way to watch a bunch of bands, primarily from your hometown?
 
Perhaps it’s that notion of community that has been established in KC music and has found a resurgence over the past 5 years, due to MMF’s efforts. As MMF’s late co-founder Abigail Henderson pointed out to me in a 2012 interview, there is a strongly held belief that KC musicians do not simply make up a scene, but “a community that fosters itself—a thinking, doing community of people practicing an art.” So what comes out of this annual pilgrimage for the musicians and organizers is not typically a huge record deal or overnight worldwide success. Statistically for a band, it can result in nothing more than a few new Facebook likes, some t-shirt/album sales, and a whole bunch of poles and trash cans with your stickers attached to them. But in addition, it can be a nourishing, satisfying, proud experience to observe and participate in.
 
The sense of pride comes from witnessing the breadth and depth of music on each stage, in many cases being created by people you know personally. Watching the dedication of MMF/MidCoast staff—from sound engineers to promoters to stage managers—who work on this effort throughout the year and tirelessly run nonstop for a week to throw a party that has made several best unofficial showcase lists. Spending hours, even days with respected acquaintances that quickly develop into friendships, jam partnerships, and/or artistic inspiration. Watching each night close with a stronger fervency than the previous one. David Hasselhoff on Acid ended the first evening by melting eardrums and grey matter with its instrumental prog-rock onslaught. Not ones to be upstaged, The Architects rounded out night two with a raucous, tight set that one would come to expect and desire from a professional but unapologetic rock ‘n roll band. By Friday night, the majority of the KC contingent [and other festgoers] had arrived, poised and ready to celebrate a vacation weekend with several dozen friends. Of course, Hearts of Darkness was the ideal band for the task of charging an eager, over-capacity crowd with even more energy and jubilation. And on Saturday, in spite of a couple hours of inclement weather and resulting schedule changes, the showcase ended with a euphoric sonic inundation. Drop A Grand had the audience dancing and grinning along to its wacky brand of garage punk, and left them spellbound by ending the set with “Baba O’Riley,” featuring the fiddle-brandishing badassery of Betse Ellis. Maps For Travelers followed up in fine fashion, with the drive, the emotion, and the post-hardcore intensity that naturally led into the final act, Federation of Horsepower. The heavy-hitting rock machine punched that first power chord around 11:28 p.m., kicking the commencement into high gear. A raging crowd shook fists and banged heads, while others hugged, shook hands, and shed celebratory tears for a job well done.
 

 

That 700-mile trip teaches many of us that we co-exist in this microcosm with other like-minded individuals, some of whom we can forge genuine connections with, and some of whom can inspire us to delve deeper into our artistic passions. Whether it’s the veteran who’s played in dozens of bands since the ‘90s or the doe-eyed 19-year-old playing his first time out of town, there’s something to be learned and celebrated about each piece that fits into that puzzle.
 
Thank you to everyone who participated by playing, organizing, or just stopping in. We’ll see you next year. Same time, same place.
 
--Michelle Bacon
 
Michelle is editor-in-chief of The Deli Magazine-Kansas City and is a member of The Philistines, Drew Black & Dirty Electric, and Dolls on Fire.
 
 
 

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The Deli KC's Best of 2013

(Photo above of The Grisly Hand, by Todd Zimmer)
 
Some of us here at The Deli KC (and a few other local music experts) have compiled our best of 2013 local lists. Here are a few of our picks…
 
Michelle Bacon, The Deli KC editor-in-chief
 
Top 10 albums of 2013
Ha Ha TonkaLessons
The Grisly HandCountry Singles
Tiny HorseDarkly Sparkly
The Latenight CallersSongs For Stolen Moments
Not A PlanetThe Few, The Proud, The Strange
ClairaudientsI’m A Loudmouth, You’re A Puppet
The Silver MaggiesMy Pale Horse
The Dead GirlsFade In/Fade Out
Freight Train Rabbit KillerFreight Train Rabbit Killer
Katy Guillen & the Girls…And Then There Were Three
 
 
Zach Hodson, The Deli KC contributor
 
Top 13 of 2013
The Grisly Hand – Country Singles
The Electric LungsSimplified and Civilized
Tiny Horse – Darkly Sparkly
The ACBsLittle Leaves
The Dead Girls – Fade In/Fade Out
Not a Planet – The Few, The Proud, The Strange
Mime GameDo Your Work
The Latenight Callers – Songs for Stolen Moments
The JinxedThe Loon
Erik VoeksFinulu
More Like GeorgiaMove On
The Octopuss MenMusic to Make Her Change Her Mind
 
Honorable mentions
BloodbirdsPsychic Surgery
SundiverThe Pull
Slum PartyFlood
Msg CtrlRolling Like a Stone
La GuerreViolent
Vi Tran BandAmerican Heroine
Man BearPower Slop
Crossed WiresCrossed Wires
 
 
Barry Lee, The Deli KC contributor / Signal To Noise on KKFI 90.1 FM
 
2013 list of homegrown specialties
Tiny Horse – “Ride” from Darkly Sparkly
The Dead Girls – “Love You To" / Signal To Noise’s Tribute To The Beatles at Knuckleheads, June 1
Cowboy Indian Bear – “Let It Down” from Live Old, Die Young
Ricky Dean Sinatra – “Werewolf” / Reunion show at Jazzhaus, July 20
Scott Hrabko – “Blue, Period” from Gone Places
Lonnie Fisher – “Ghosts Driving in My Van” from Ghosts and Dreams
Erik Voeks – “Hester A. Fish” from Finulu
The Quivers – “He Had It Coming” from Gots To Have It!
Betse Ellis – “Straight To Hell” / Wednesday MidDay Medley’s (KKFI) 500th show, November 20
Radkey – “Out Here in My Head” from Cat & Mouse
 
 
Danny R. Phillips, Deli KC contributor
 
Best album: Many Moods of DadThe Consequence of Trying
Best EP: Black on BlackGet On With It
Best song: Scruffy & the Janitors – “Shake It Off”
 
Other best albums
Pale HeartsHollowtown
Bloodbirds – Psychic Surgery
Missouri HomegrownYou Asked For It
Red KateWhen the Troubles Come
The PedaljetsWhat’s in Between
Stiff Middle FingersAt the Scene of the Crime
DsoedeanContinue to Move
The Grisly Hand – Country Singles
 
Best shows
Bob Mould / The Pedaljets at The Bottleneck, August 16
Lawrence Field Day Fest at The Bottleneck, July 11-13
Cupcake / Scruffy & the Janitors / Universe Contest at The Rendezvous (St. Joseph), March 22
 
 
 
 
Top 10 albums of 2013
The Grisly Hand Country Singles
Tech N9neSomething Else
Mark LowreyTangos for 18th Street
The ArchitectsBorder Wars: Episode I
Eddie Moore and the Outer CircleThe Freedom of Expression
AlaturkaYalniz
Reggie BDNA
Cowboy Indian Bear – Live Old, Die Young
Dutch NewmanSchorre's Son
AkkillesSomething You'd Say
 
 
Steven Tulipana, co–owner of recordBar / miniBar
 
Favorite recordBar moments of 2013
Kishi Bashi / Plume Giant, February 17
Sonic Spectrum’s Tribute to Lou Reed and The Velvet Underground, May 26
Bob Log III, July 23
Richard Buckner, October 30
Jon Spencer Blues Explosion / Kid Congo, October 7
Found A Job performs The Talking Heads’ Stop Making Sense, November 29

 
Thanks for all your support this year! We look forward to hearing more excellent music in 2014.

Also, don't forget to visit www.voteformmf.com! We have tonight and tomorrow to vote for Midwest Music Foundation, so cast your vote now!
  
The Deli KC staff
 

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Artist Spotlight: The Philistines

One of the newer additions to Kansas City's musical family, The Philistines are making themselves heard on the strength of a playlist in which you can hear sounds inspired by the Velvet Underground, the Black Angels, and Calexico, among others. If bands aim to be greater than the sum of their parts, The Philistines will have their work cut out for them, as this sextet includes some of KC's most well-known and experienced players. The Deli KC would like to know more ...
 
The Deli: Give us a thumbnail description of the sound of The Philistines.
 
Cody Wyoming: Psychedelic rock. Sometimes heavy, sometimes dreamy.
 
Kimberely Queen: Go-go acid pop.
 
Steve Gardels: Loud, drippy '70s-era psych with a '60s pop attitude.
 
Rod Peal: Psychedelic pop stoner rock, the best of all my favorite genres.
 
The Deli: How did the band come to be?
 
Cody: While we were cold and snowed in last winter, we started making music and writing songs together. Then we did a few live shows as a duo and quickly decided that we needed to expand.
 
Kimmie: I wished REAL hard.
 
Steve: I found myself bandless after 4 years with Appropriate Grammar. Cody sent me a message about jamming together, and I wound up with an unexpected day off. I headed down to Midwestern Musical Co., jammed through a couple of things and decided to see where it went. Next thing I know, they're packing out the roster with talented people and I started to fall in love with the songs. Pretty cool for an informal afternoon jam!
 
Rod: Just sort of happened. Cody said he had something cooking he thought that I would like. It’s all been very natural, unlike any other project I’ve been in.
 
Michelle Bacon: Cody approached me shortly after we played the Rolling Stones tribute (in our respective bands), and I jumped at the chance to work with him and Kimmie, not knowing who else was in the project. Judging from how well the six of us have meshed in a pretty short time, he has a great sense of putting different levels/types of ability and personality together to make a band work.
  
The Deli: At your debut show at The Brick last month (which was excellent, by the way), it seemed that psychedelic-influenced sounds were the main path that you will follow in the future.  What is it about that genre that’s so appealing?
 
Cody: I’ve always been in to psychedelic music, but for some reason its influence never showed itself in my original work. Since I took a turn down this path it’s like a dam broke. Both the quality and volume of my output has increased enormously. I like psychedelic music for its transcendent qualities. That’s kind of the point of it. To help you get “out there.” When done right, it works on you on a very subconscious level. I hope I do it right.
 
Kimmie: It's just what's been speaking to me the clearest artistically in music, film, and design.
 
Steve: I'm a metal head! I'm a big fan of anything dark or heavy, and what we play tends to do both; even at the same time! I find myself taking apart and repurposing licks from Iron Maiden and Black Sabbath a lot. The great thing about this is that everyone in our band has broad musical tastes, so I hear new stuff every week and try to take home things I like and see if I can't work them in to my parts.
 
Rod: It’s everything I want wrapped up into one package.
 
Michelle: I love the groove, weight, and atmosphere of psychedelic rock. Really, I just love playing gritty, unapologetic rock ‘n roll, and it’s new and exciting to me because I’ve only played bass in one other band.
 
The Deli: Who influences your music?
 
Cody: The Flaming Lips are a big influence, but also The Velvet Underground, Love and Rockets, Mazzy Star, The Brian Jonestown Massacre, The Jesus and Mary Chain, and Black Sabbath. But hidden under the feedback and reverb, there’s some pretty basic early rock ‘n roll and even girl group influences. There’s some Buddy Holly and Elvis in there as well as The Ronnettes and the Crystals.
 
Kimmie: Love and Rockets, the Velvet Underground, The Jesus & Mary Chain, Sabbath, and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club are probably the most obvious influences. Some others are Italian and British horror cinema of the ‘60s and ‘70s, Hugh Hefner, and The Monkees.
 
Rod: Queens of the Stone Age, Kyuss, Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks, The Beatles, The Stones, The Sonics, The Stooges, Expo ‘70.
 
The Deli: Everyone in The Philistines either is or has been involved in other projects as well; does having so much going on outside the group make it easier or more challenging to create new music?
 
Cody: I have always had a short attention span, musically speaking. I’m interested in a lot of different and sometimes seemingly disparate things, and I feel that I need to cultivate them all. Sometimes it leaves me a little scattered. But I think it’s important to explore your interests. I’m glad everybody in this band does other things; I want everybody in my band to be as creatively fulfilled as they can be. I never want somebody to get resentful of the band because they’re feeling stifled or something.
 
Steve: The other groups I've played with are SO different from what we do that no one is in direct competition with another. I learn new tricks at each practice, so I get to apply things across all of my bands to see what works. I'm broadening my abilities as a drummer and learning new styles at the same time. It's pretty wonderful.
 
Rod: I’m one of the only ones that hasn’t had a project recently. I think that everyone else’s projects have been an attribute to this one.
 
Michelle: All of my projects teach me different techniques and allow me to express a different part of myself. None of them interferes with one another. It certainly keeps me busy, but I wouldn’t trade it for anything else.
 
The Deli: You’re a new band trying to get gigs; obviously most of you are already well known in the music community and have name recognition, so how much does that help when it comes to finding places to play?
 
Cody: Yeah, fortunately we all independently have fairly good reputations and relationships with venues. And obviously that helps immensely. But since we’ve only played a couple gigs so far, only time will tell.
 
Kimmie: Yes, I guess we are all well-known in certain circles. Which means we all work really hard towards our interests. It's a product of our time, work, and efforts if anyone wants to beef over it.
 
Steve: I'm happy to say that we have no problem finding shows as a result. We've only played three, but we seem to get great lineups at cool venues with little to no difficulty.
   
The Deli: Cody, what’s it like to be in a band with Kimmie?  Kimmie, what’s it like to be in a band with Cody?  Everyone else, what’s it like to be in a band with Kimmie and Cody?
 
Cody: It’s a blast. I’ve never worked creatively with a significant other before. It presents its own sets of rewards and challenges. Because Kimmie is so damned talented and she’s also my best friend, the rewards significantly outweigh the challenges. But also challenges are bitchin’, because overcoming them is how you learn. I love collaborating, and I think we collaborate well together.
 
Kimmie: Being in a band with Cody is like being on the Zipper at Santa-Cali-Gon with my best friend who I have a big crush on. Being in the band with the rest of The Philistines and Cody is like being on the merry-go-round with the Lost Boys.
 
Steve: They're adorable. And smart. And hilarious. I've gotten to know them a lot better over the last few months and they are great friends and walking encyclopedias of cool stuff. They demand nothing less than the best, but they make us want to put it forward. It's a really great and creative working environment with a family atmosphere.
 
Rod: Cody and Kimmie are the duke and duchess of the Kansas City music scene. They are pure, 100% unadulterated rock ‘n roll.
 
Michelle: Cody and Kimmie make me pop all of my Latenight Collars. Their collective energy and musical abilities simultaneously challenge me and make them a blast to work with. Same thing goes for Josh, Rod, and Steve.
 
Note: Josh Mobley is the band’s keyboardist, and was unable to participate in this interview.
 
The Deli: With whom would you like to work in the future, locally or otherwise?
 
Cody: There’s a lot of great psych stuff going on in the area these days. I’m a big fan of The ConquerorsBloodbirds, Expo ’70, and Monta At Odds, among many others that we would love to play with. But I’m always thrilled to share a stage with any kind of good music and I’m a big fan of diverse bills. I’d love to share a bill with a sword swallower, a DJ, and a string quartet.
 
SteveBLACK MOUNTAIN. Or Nick Cave. The Conquerors. Snake Island!... It's really hard to make a short list because there's just so much cool stuff going on around KC as well as coming through. The possibilities are endless! I'm just excited to see who we wind up with and where. 3 shows out and we're playing with bands that I LOVE seeing live. Here's hoping for a continuing trend of badass rock and roll.
 
Rod: I owned a store called Halcyon and met almost everyone in this music scene through that experience. There are very few that I would not like to work with. But in particular I’d like to work with Justin Wright of Expo ‘70, Jeremiah James of Redder Moon, and Dedric Moore of Monta At Odds.
 
The Deli: This goes out to whoever is brave enough to answer: what’s your musical guilty pleasure? 
 
Cody: This is kind of a copout. But I refuse to feel guilty for anything that I like. But I do feel a little occasional twinge for Sting’s work in the ‘90s.
 
Kimmie: ‘80s Casio funk.
 
Rod: Yacht rock. In particular, Loggins and Nicks duets.
 
Thank you to The Philistines for taking some time for The Deli KC. Best of luck in your future endeavors!

The Philistines are: 
Cody Wyoming – guitar, vocals
Kimberely Queen – vocals
Michelle Bacon – bass
Rod Peal – guitar
Josh Mobley – keys
Steve Gardels – drums
 
 
The Philistines will be opening up for The Besnard Lakes on Tuesday, November 26 at The Riot Room. Pioneer will begin the show at 9 pm. Facebook event page.Ticket link.
 
 
--Michael Byars 
 

Michael's musical guilty pleasure is Air Supply (I KNEW it!). Don't tell. 

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Midwest Music Foundation Staff Spotlight: Michelle Bacon

(Photo by Todd Zimmer)
 
The Midwest Music Foundation staff constantly works behind the scenes at live music events you have likely attended. They’re the ones who search for facilities, supply entertainment, coordinate with vendors, and generally ensure that your live music experience will be a good one. They’re also the ones that get the word out about musicians’ health care and other educational resources for musicians, filling a vital gap in the community.
 
Before the advent of the sixth annual Apocalypse Meow benefit, we hear back from some of the staff to find out what they do and why they do it. Now we’ll turn the tables on Michelle Bacon, editor of The Deli KC and Promotions Assistant/Social Media Coordinator for MMF.
 
The Deli: When and how did you first get involved with MMF?
 
Michelle: Michael Byars asked me to help with some of the web admin stuff for The Mailbox (his now unfortunately defunct podcast). I had been interested in the organization since hearing about its mission; I started blogging a bit on the website and volunteered at events. Then last year at MidCoast Takeover, The Deli was so impressed by the showcase that they asked if MMF would be involved in expanding its local music publication to KC, making it 1 of only 11 cities in the nation represented. Rhonda [Lyne] asked me to head up the publication, and I was more than honored to do so.
 
The Deli: What is your current role with the organization?
 
Michelle: I’m the editor of The Deli KC, which you are feasting your eyeballs on right this very moment. I hope you dig it. I also help maintain MMF’s social media presence and sometimes help with show promotion and booking and such. And I’ll edit anything you send me, because it would drive me crazy not to.
 
The Deli: Why is MMF such an important cause to you? What do you hope it will accomplish in the future?
 
Michelle: The music community has provided me with just that—a sense of community and belonging and likemindedness. Having MMF in this city provides all of us local musicians with a commonality: our devotion to what we do and an understanding of why we do it. And I want to do as much as I can to get the word out about MMF in as many ways as I can. I hope that we continue to grow, and hope The Deli can be a catalyst to bring more attention to KC music.
 
The Deli: Who are some of your favorite local artists?
 
Michelle: I would tell you, but then I’d have to add more hyperlinks to this post. Darn.
 
The Deli: Do you have a favorite memory of a past Meow? 
 
Michelle: I’m still the new kid on the block. Meow 4 was my first time in attendance, and I barely knew anyone there. Last year was Meow 5, and I had the honor of performing as well as volunteering for the first time. The overall experience was wonderful; I interviewed Abby shortly before the event, and seeing the show executed so well made it even more affirming of how much of an accomplishment it was.
 
The Deli: What are you most looking forward to about this year's Meow?
 
Michelle: This weekend is going to be amazing for a number of reasons. I think everyone’s simultaneously excited and nervous, because it’s a big year—our first without Abby. It’s obviously going to be tough for many. I think the music will expose a lot of emotions, both for audience and musician. But this community has grown and will continue to grow together with these experiences; these are the kinds of things that push people to make astounding strides. I really think it’ll be beautiful, and I can’t wait to be a part of it. I’m honored to play again as well with an amazing group of folks in The Philistines.
 
 
Michelle will be at Apocalypse Meow all weekend, volunteering and playing bass with The Philistines on Saturday night. The event starts tomorrow, November 1 at The Midwestern Musical Co. and Saturday at Knuckleheads. Doors open at 6 pm both nights. Friday’s show is free and all ages, Saturday’s show is $10, 21+. Visit http://www.apocalypsemeow.net for a full lineup and schedule. Ticket linkFacebook event page. To find out more about MMF, visit http://midwestmusicfound.org, and learn about Abby's Fund for musicians' health care.
 

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